Drink Pink For Breast Cancer!

Join us for a very special day of tasting our latest arrival of gorgeous rosés!  Rosé is more than a simple pink wine. While a symbol of summer sipping, the diversity of styles makes rosé a versatile pairing with many meals.  And remember not all pink wine is sweet!   

We'll have an array of spring specialties for you to try, along with 20 different wines!  We are also taking donations for the North Shore Cancer Walk.  

How Rosé Wine Is Made

Typically rosé wines are made from black (or red) grapes, and traditionally the wine is fermented dry. While different production methods exist, the most usual is ‘maceration’, whereby the black grapes are gently crushed and the juice is left in contact with the skins for short time to extract just enough color to achieve the desired hue. The length of time depends on the grape variety used, as well the winemaker’s color and style preference.

Once the maceration is complete, the wine is fermented, like a white wine, off the skins. The choice of fermentation vessel, as well as fermentation temperature, also influences the resulting style of wine. Cooler ferments tend to produce more fruit driven styles, while warmer fermentation temperatures give more structure to the wine.

Some styles such as ‘Blush’ or Vin Gris are the palest in color, as they do not go through any pre-fermentation maceration. Off-dry or sweeter styles are usually fermented dry and then some sweetening concentrate is added back, or the fermentation is stopped before all the sugar has been converted into alcohol.

Most rosé wines are best enjoyed within a year or two of their release. While many can hold up well for a few years, they really do not improve with extended bottle age. Colors range from the palest salmon hue to deep neon pink. Aromas and flavors are diverse and run the gamut of strawberry, raspberry, redcurrant, cherry and watermelon interwoven with all sorts of dried herbs, spice, and floral notes.